Sunday, August 20, 2017

Hess Ancestors



Most remote ancestor: Heinrich Hess about 1535 (several wives)

Great 12: Hess, Oberholzer, Kunz, Knecht

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Bronze Age

"The Yamna culture is a Late Copper Age/Early Bronze Age culture of the Southern Bug/Dniester/Ural region (the Pontic steppe), dating to the 36th–23rd centuries BC. The name also appears in English as Pit-Grave Culture or Ochre-Grave Culture. The Catacomb culture, c. 2800–2200 BC, comprises several related Early Bronze Age cultures occupying what is presently Ukraine. The Srubna culture was a Late Bronze Age (18th–12th centuries BC) culture. It is a successor to the Yamna and the Poltavka culture."


Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Cousin Visit

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Cousin Cora and I are descended from Jeannette & Henrich Aeppli, then Willi & Mono Aeppli. Her father was Paul Vital Aeppli and my grandmother was Eva Aeppli, his sister. My father Felix Vital Leu was Cora's cousin.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Greg's Ancestry from 23andme.com

MATERNAL: BRENNAN & LEOPOLD



Origin and Migrations of Haplogroup U5a2a 

 U5a2a is a relatively young branch of one of the oldest European haplogroups — U5. The members of U5a2a trace their maternal lines back to a woman who lived approximately 13,000 years ago, at the end of the Ice Age. For several thousand years, humans had survived the last great cold peak in a small number of more hospitable refuges in the south and the east of the continent. Then, around 14,000 years ago, the ice sheets covering the interior of the continent began to recede and human populations started to re-expand north. As they spread out and thrived in the newly hospitable continent, new maternal lineages emerged, including U5a2a.

 Today, members of U5a2a are frequently found among Poles, Russians, Belarusians, and Czechs. 

U5a2a is relatively common among 23andMe customers.  Today, you share your haplogroup with all the maternal-line descendants of the common ancestor of U5a2a, including other 23andMe customers. The Cheddar Man also belonged to U5a

The Cheddar Man


The Cheddar Man is named for Cheddar Gorge, England. 

First discovered in 1903 in Cheddar Gorge, Somerset, England, the Cheddar Man is Britain's oldest complete human skeleton. Researchers have dated his bones back to nearly 9,000 years ago, when the Ice Age had ended but farming technology had not yet made its way across the continent, and people in England still survived by hunting and gathering. Unfortunately for the Cheddar Man, a bone lesion above his right eye shows he likely had a bone infection, and other skeletal evidence suggests his days of hunting may have come to a violent end.

 More recently, Bryan Sykes of Oxford University extracted mitochondrial DNA from one of the Cheddar Man's teeth, and found that his maternal haplogroup was U5.

PATERNAL: REKAS & BRODIE



Origin and Migrations of Haplogroup J-M267 

 You descend from the paternal lineage of haplogroup J1-M267, one of the oldest branches of haplogroup J. Haplogroup J1-M267 originated 31,000-36,000 years ago in the Middle East, over 20,000 years before the advent of farming and about 10,000 years before the height of the last Ice Age. While haplogroup J is a large haplogroup with a wide geographic range, including Europe, North Africa, and Asia, J1-M267 is much less widespread. Members of J1-M267 are most commonly found in ethnic groups throughout the Middle East, North Africa, and Ethiopia, and are only rarely seen in Europe. Specifically, people who belong to J1-M267 have been found in Morocco, North Africa, Algeria, Algeria, Tunisia, Ethiopia, Iraq, Lebanon, Palestine, Turkey, Georgia, Greece, Albania, Italy, Pakistan, and central Asia. Members of J1-M267 have been found in Sahrawish, Bedouin, Ashkenazim and Sephardim Jewish, and Hunza populations.

 Haplogroup J1-M267 was involved in two migrations that are responsible for its current geographic distribution. During the first migration, which happened about 8,000 years ago, members of your haplogroup migrated from the Middle East into East Africa and Europe. This migration may have been associated with the initial spread of farming technology and culture, one of the most important technological innovations in human history. During the second migration, Arabic members of J1-M267 migrated from the southern part of the Middle East into North Africa around the year 700 AD. The more recent migration was likely associated with the emergence and spread of Islam.

 J-M267 is relatively common among 23andMe customers. Today, you share your haplogroup with all the men who are paternal-line descendants of the common ancestor of J-M267, including other 23andMe customers.

Your haplogroup was carried by the first farmers.


J-M267 Your paternal line traces back to the branch J-M267, which was involved in two significant migrations. During the first migration, which happened about 8,000 years ago, members of your haplogroup migrated from the Middle East into East Africa and Europe. This migration may have been associated with the initial spread of farming technology and culture, one of the most important technological innovations in human history. During the second migration, Arabic members of J-M267 migrated from the southern part of the Middle East into North Africa around the year 700 AD. The more recent migration was likely associated with the emergence and spread of Islam.

IiMy Paternal Haplogroup from 23andme

PATERNAL: LEU & AEPPLI

*thanks to my half-brother (paternal) DNA

Origin and Migrations of Haplogroup R-M269

 Your paternal line stems from a branch of R-M343 called R-M269, one of the most prolific paternal lineages across western Eurasia. R-M269 arose roughly 10,000 years ago, as the people of the Fertile Crescent domesticated plants and animals for the first time. Around 8,000 years ago, the first farmers and herders began to push east into Central Asia and north into the Caucasus Mountains. Some of them eventually reached the steppes above the Black and Caspian Seas. There, they lived as pastoral nomads, herding cattle and sheep across the grasslands, while their neighbors to the south developed yet another crucial technology in human history: bronze smelting. As bronze tools and weaponry spread north, a new steppe culture called the Yamnaya was born.

Yamnaya


 Around 5,000 years ago, perhaps triggered by a cold spell that made it difficult to feed their herds, Yamnaya men spilled east across Siberia and down into Central Asia. To the west, they pushed down into the Balkans and to central Europe, where they sought new pastures for their herds and metal deposits to support burgeoning Bronze Age commerce. Over time, their descendants spread from central Europe to the Atlantic coast, establishing new trade routes and an unprecedented level of cultural contact and exchange in western Europe.

The men from the steppes also outcompeted the local men as they went; their success is demonstrated in the overwhelming dominance of the R-M269 lineage in Europe. Over 80% of men in Ireland and Wales carry the haplogroup, as do over 60% of men along the Atlantic Coast from Spain to France. The frequency of R-M269 gradually decreases to the east, falling to about 30% in Germany, 20% in Poland, and 10-15% in Greece and Turkey. The haplogroup connects all these men to still others in the Iranian Plateau and Central Asia, where between 5 and 10% of men also bear the lineage.

R-L20 < 8,000 Years Ago

Your paternal haplogroup, R-L20, traces back to a man who lived less than 8,000 years ago. That's nearly 320 generations ago! What happened between then and now? As researchers and citizen scientists discover more about your haplogroup, new details may be added to the story of your paternal line.


You share a paternal-line ancestor with Niall of the Nine Hostages, Irish King of Tara. 

R-M269 Perhaps more myth than man, Niall of the Nine Hostages is said to have been a King of Tara in northwestern Ireland in the late 4th century C.E. His name comes from a tale of nine hostages that he held from the regions he ruled over. Though the legendary stories of his life may have been invented hundreds of years after he died, genetic evidence suggests that the Uí Néill dynasty, whose name means "descendants of Niall," did in fact trace back to just one man who bore haplogroup R-M269.



 The Uí Néill ruled to various degrees as kings of Ireland from the 7th to the 11th century C.E. In the highly patriarchal society of medieval Ireland, their status allowed them to have outsized numbers of children and spread their paternal lineage each generation. In fact, researchers have estimated that between 2 and 3 million men with roots in north-west Ireland are paternal-line descendants of Niall."



My Maternal Haplogroup dates back to the Vikings invading Britain
https://myjaneaology.blogspot.com/2015/12/23andme.html

Friday, August 4, 2017

My father's chart

I received a copy of this hand calculated chart or my father that was done in 1967.



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